Showing posts with label how to find tennis players. Show all posts
Showing posts with label how to find tennis players. Show all posts

How to play tennis nearby on any budget

10 Easy Ways to Play Tennis Locally

5 Easy Ways to Play Tennis Locally

Tennis begins as the weather warms up
Whether it's Singles or Doubles, here are some suggestions to find a partner or a team to join.

New to the area? Where to meet other players?
You can find hitting partners or seasonal leagues anywhere in the USA. Below are some options from least to most expensive.

Basic tennis gear is all you need to start - shoes, a racket, and some balls
You can start playing again with just tennis shoes, a basic racket, and a can of $3 tennis balls. If you enjoy it, gradually upgrade the strings and other gear as you play more regularly.

Practice Walls

Locate your nearest tennis courts with a practice wall. If you spend time practicing at a tennis wall, chances are good you'll find other players with the same mindset for improvement. You can also quickly judge their technique to see if you want to ask them to hit.

Pick-up Matches

Go to the same public park regularly a few times a week, and you're bound to run into them.
Weekend warriors or after-work sparing partners tend to be found at the local parks during peak times.

Facebook Online Groups

Most areas with a large tennis population will have several groups to join and feature a free message board to contact other players. Use common sense with your personal safety when arranging a match with strangers in public areas.

In the DC/VA/MD area, we lead a group of about 700 players strong.
With your first introduction post, include your skill level (3.0, 3.5, etc), years of experience, how often you play a week, and your preferences (singles, doubles, rallies, practicing drills).

Meetup.com Tennis Groups

Joining a free group event is a great way to get your bearings and find a regular group of casual playing partners. The skill level is usually across the board, but with multiple courts, usually, you can usually rotate around until you find the right pairing.

Note:  Bring a can of new balls and be open to making new friends. I would avoid any that require upfront money or push you towards coaching lessons.

Recreational Leagues

In many popular tennis regions, such as Atlanta, San Diego, or Austin, local tennis leagues are available to join for ~$30/season or even per year. You can locate a better-defined skill range and challenge a big list of nearby players. Collect contact info to set up matches later.

Tennis Classes or Weekly Drills

Joining a local tennis class is a great way to get rid of rust and engage with similar players. Often you can join a "drop-in" class if you're new to town. With weekly lessons, you'll build good habits and can join new classes that are always starting.

For the Rafa Fans, both adults and juniors camps in the USA.
Get a $50 discount using "JCTENNIS" promo code when registering.

Organized Events - Memberships, Event Entry Fees

  • USTA - $44 per year (but comes with a Wilson and Head rebate)
    • Leagues - $30+ per season; By NTRP, 18+, 40+, 55+, etc
    • Tournaments - $60+ per event; Singles and Doubles
    • Flex-leagues - play 3 to 4 arranged matches in a month or two.

  • Universal Tennis Rating (UTR) - $90/year plus event entry fees;
    • UTR targets the more competitive "semi-pro" levels or former college players.
    • Some regional tennis leagues will report match scores that count toward your UTR rating.
    • Knowing your UTR # helps you match up with someone at the same level as you.

  • Private Tennis Clubs - $$$ per month;

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